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“The Master Series: Michael Bierut” Opens at SVA


The Master Series: Michael Bierut, the first comprehensive retrospective of the work of Pentagram’s Michael Bierut, is now on view at the School of Visual Arts. The exhibition features his designs for identity systems, environmental graphics, books and more, from his signage programs for the New York City Department of Transportation and the New York Times Building, to his posters for the Yale School of Architecture, to his symbols for MIT Media Lab, Saks Fifth Avenue, and Hillary Clinton’s campaign. It also shares personal works from his own collection, including over 100 of the sketchbooks he uses to brainstorm and refine his ideas, displayed together for the first time.

The exhibition is the 27th in SVA’s annual Master Series honoring great visual communicators and coincides with the publication of Bierut’s first monograph, How to use graphic design to sell things, explain things look better, make people laugh, make people cry, and (every once in a while) change the world (Thames & Hudson and Harper Design).

In conjunction with the exhibition, Bierut will give a talk on his work on Wednesday, October 14, 7 pm, at the SVA Theatre, 333 West 23rd Street. Admission is free and open to the public.

The Master Series: Michael Bierut remains on view through November 7 at the SVA Chelsea Gallery, 601 West 26th Street, 15th floor, New York City.

New Work: The Little Book of Typographic Ornament


Typographic ornaments are the jewellery of the printed world, providing flourishes over and above what is needed. Ranging from rules to borders to printers’ flowers, they are visual garnishes which do not aid the function of a printed object. Rather, they provide a stylistic treat for the eyes that run alongside a narrative.

The Little Book of Typographic Ornament is a celebration of these graphic decorations, conceived by Angus Hyland and including examples from 1700 up until present day.

Introducing New Partners: Luke Powell and Jody Hudson-Powell


On 1st October Pentagram London welcomed Luke Powell and Jody Hudson-Powell as partners. To celebrate, we invited clients, collaborators and friends to meet Luke and Jody over champagne, canapés and swing music. Luke and Jody join Pentagram from Hudson-Powell, a studio that they founded in 2005. Over the past decade they have developed a varied portfolio encompassing graphic design, identity creation, creative technology and immersive experiences. Alongside his work at Hudson-Powell, Jody also held the position of Design Director at international branding agency Wolff Olins.

New Work: ‘No Problem: Cologne/New York 1984-1989’


In the 1980s, New York and Cologne were twin cities of the contemporary art world, a pair of visionary local art scenes who were engaged in an intercity cultural dialogue that helped produce many of the generation’s most influential artists and galleries. This remarkable era is explored in No Problem: Cologne/New York 1984-1989, a new publication from David Zwirner Books. Pentagram’s Michael Bierut and Laitsz Ho have created a design for the book that reflects the exuberant spirit of the period and its art.

The book follows the 2014 exhibition of the same name at David Zwirner, one of the first surveys to look at the connection between the two cities. In the 1980s, art being produced in and around Cologne started gaining international attention, and a growing gallery scene supported emerging work from the region and beyond. German artists such as Martin Kippenberger, Rosemarie Trockel and Albert Oehlen were exhibited along with the latest contemporary art from the U.S. by artists like Jeff Koons, Richard Prince, Cindy Sherman, Raymond Pettibon, Richard Prince and Christopher Wool. At the same time, New York galleries such as Metro Pictures and Barbara Gladstone were showing the works of German artists. This cross-fertilization helped shape the vibrant art and visual culture of the period and decades since.

New Work: ‘Co-ordinates’


London is one of the most mapped cities in the world. Unpredictable and complex, its gradual growth from a collection of villages to a metropolis has been charted endlessly. As part of London Design Festival dn&co are celebrating these cartographic iterations with Co-ordinates, an exhibition of A1 prints mapping London.

Domenic Lippa and Jeremy Kunze have designed Pentagram’s contribution to the exhibition. The print hangs alongside submissions from 25 of London’s top design studios, including Bibliothèque, Hingson Studio, Poke and Spin.

New Work: William Morris Society


William Morris had a profound affect on Victorian Britain. Aligned with the Arts and Crafts Movement, he was a polymath who’s work encompassed design, craft, the written word and the socialist movement. A century on, Morris continues to be an influential figure – a feat which is in no small part down to the work of The William Morris Society. Set up in 1955, the society’s goal is to preserve Morris’ memory by introducing his ideas on creative work, leisure, conservation and politics to new generations.

In time with its 50th Anniversary, Angus Hyland and team have created a new identity for the society. A rebrand was needed to unify the society’s communications, which had previously included four separate logos with eleven variations.

Awards: Society for Experiential Graphic Design 2015


The Society for Experiential Graphic Design recently announced the winners of the SEGD Global Design Awards, which are featured in the September issue of the organization’s eg Magazine.  A mutli-disciplinary jury led by SEGD principal Graham Hanson honored outstanding work that exemplified this year’s theme, “Experience,” through the integration of digital and traditional media in compelling designs.

We are pleased to announce that several Pentagram projects were awarded this year, which include event graphics, environmental graphics, exhibition design, and branding.

New Work: Teach for America Headquarters

It’s back-to-school throughout New York City’s public schools this week, marking the start of the 25th academic year for Teach for America, the non-profit organization that recruits teachers for underserved communities throughout the United States. The organization, which has grown significantly since its conception in 1989, recently moved its headquarters from Midtown to 25 Broadway in the Financial District, located across from the famous “Charging Bull” statue. Pentagram’s Michael Bierut and his team have designed a program of environmental graphics for the new space that reflects and reinforces Teach for America’s educational mission and collaborative spirit.

Founded by Wendy Kopp, Teach for America recruits recent college graduates to teach in schools throughout the country. In 25 years, the organization has grown from serving 6 regions to impacting 52 regions across the continental United States, with nearly 6,000 teachers, or corps members, and over 28,000 alumni. Teach for America’s culture is founded on five core values—transformational change, team, leadership, respect and humility, diversity—which guide the actions and decisions of the corps members and alumni. Bierut and his team worked closely with Teach for America to incorporate these core values into the environment of their New York City headquarters.