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Introducing New Partners: Luke Powell and Jody Hudson-Powell


On 1st October Pentagram London welcomed Luke Powell and Jody Hudson-Powell as partners. To celebrate, we invited clients, collaborators and friends to meet Luke and Jody over champagne, canapés and swing music. Luke and Jody join Pentagram from Hudson-Powell, a studio that they founded in 2005. Over the past decade they have developed a varied portfolio encompassing graphic design, identity creation, creative technology and immersive experiences. Alongside his work at Hudson-Powell, Jody also held the position of Design Director at international branding agency Wolff Olins.

New Work: ‘No Problem: Cologne/New York 1984-1989’


In the 1980s, New York and Cologne were twin cities of the contemporary art world, a pair of visionary local art scenes who were engaged in an intercity cultural dialogue that helped produce many of the generation’s most influential artists and galleries. This remarkable era is explored in No Problem: Cologne/New York 1984-1989, a new publication from David Zwirner Books. Pentagram’s Michael Bierut and Laitsz Ho have created a design for the book that reflects the exuberant spirit of the period and its art.

The book follows the 2014 exhibition of the same name at David Zwirner, one of the first surveys to look at the connection between the two cities. In the 1980s, art being produced in and around Cologne started gaining international attention, and a growing gallery scene supported emerging work from the region and beyond. German artists such as Martin Kippenberger, Rosemarie Trockel and Albert Oehlen were exhibited along with the latest contemporary art from the U.S. by artists like Jeff Koons, Richard Prince, Cindy Sherman, Raymond Pettibon, Richard Prince and Christopher Wool. At the same time, New York galleries such as Metro Pictures and Barbara Gladstone were showing the works of German artists. This cross-fertilization helped shape the vibrant art and visual culture of the period and decades since.

New Work: ‘Co-ordinates’


London is one of the most mapped cities in the world. Unpredictable and complex, its gradual growth from a collection of villages to a metropolis has been charted endlessly. As part of London Design Festival dn&co are celebrating these cartographic iterations with Co-ordinates, an exhibition of A1 prints mapping London.

Domenic Lippa and Jeremy Kunze have designed Pentagram’s contribution to the exhibition. The print hangs alongside submissions from 25 of London’s top design studios, including Bibliothèque, Hingson Studio, Poke and Spin.

New Work: William Morris Society


William Morris had a profound affect on Victorian Britain. Aligned with the Arts and Crafts Movement, he was a polymath who’s work encompassed design, craft, the written word and the socialist movement. A century on, Morris continues to be an influential figure – a feat which is in no small part down to the work of The William Morris Society. Set up in 1955, the society’s goal is to preserve Morris’ memory by introducing his ideas on creative work, leisure, conservation and politics to new generations.

In time with its 50th Anniversary, Angus Hyland and team have created a new identity for the society. A rebrand was needed to unify the society’s communications, which had previously included four separate logos with eleven variations.

Awards: Society for Experiential Graphic Design 2015


The Society for Experiential Graphic Design recently announced the winners of the SEGD Global Design Awards, which are featured in the September issue of the organization’s eg Magazine.  A mutli-disciplinary jury led by SEGD principal Graham Hanson honored outstanding work that exemplified this year’s theme, “Experience,” through the integration of digital and traditional media in compelling designs.

We are pleased to announce that several Pentagram projects were awarded this year, which include event graphics, environmental graphics, exhibition design, and branding.

New Work: Teach for America Headquarters

It’s back-to-school throughout New York City’s public schools this week, marking the start of the 25th academic year for Teach for America, the non-profit organization that recruits teachers for underserved communities throughout the United States. The organization, which has grown significantly since its conception in 1989, recently moved its headquarters from Midtown to 25 Broadway in the Financial District, located across from the famous “Charging Bull” statue. Pentagram’s Michael Bierut and his team have designed a program of environmental graphics for the new space that reflects and reinforces Teach for America’s educational mission and collaborative spirit.

Founded by Wendy Kopp, Teach for America recruits recent college graduates to teach in schools throughout the country. In 25 years, the organization has grown from serving 6 regions to impacting 52 regions across the continental United States, with nearly 6,000 teachers, or corps members, and over 28,000 alumni. Teach for America’s culture is founded on five core values—transformational change, team, leadership, respect and humility, diversity—which guide the actions and decisions of the corps members and alumni. Bierut and his team worked closely with Teach for America to incorporate these core values into the environment of their New York City headquarters.

New Work: Verizon

Currently ranked #15 on the Fortune 500 list, Verizon is one of the largest communication technology companies in the world and the largest wireless provider in the United States. The company was born in 2000, the result of a merger between Bell Atlantic and GTE. The new company adopted as its name a portmanteau of veritas and horizon, and a logo that today appears everywhere from big rig trucks to handheld devices.

The complexity of the original Verizon logo—it incorporates a modified italic typeface, two colors, a stylized letter “z,” a v-shaped form that sometimes appears above the name and sometimes next to it, and gradations in multiple locations—has made it difficult to reliably reproduce in different media. This inconsistency has only increased over time.

More importantly, over the last fifteen years the way we communicate has changed dramatically, and so has Verizon. Last week, the company introduced a dramatically simplified new logo designed by Pentagram that reflects those changes, and positions the company for the future.

The new logo, designed by Pentagram’s Michael Bierut and his team, retains the essence of the original logo’s DNA and realigns the mark with Verizon’s core values: simplicity, reliability, and dedication to its customers. The customized letterforms have been eliminated in favor of a straightforward treatment of the company name in Neue Haas Grotesk, fine tuned by Christian Schwartz of Commercial Type. The color red—long a salient feature of Verizon’s identity—serves as an accent, in a brighter, cleaner hue. Finally, the “v” symbol is now a checkmark, the universally understood symbol for getting things done. Placed at the end of the wordmark, the checkmark serves as a sign-off and endorsement to the Verizon name. Says Verizon’s chief marketing officer Diego Scotti, “It does what a great logo does best. It evokes both what we offer, and who we are.”

New Work: Rockaway Beach


When Hurricane Sandy devastated New York in 2012, Rockaway Beach in Queens lost much of its iconic boardwalk. This summer, as part of the ongoing restoration of the area, the first sections of a new boardwalk have been completed and reopened to the public with a more resilient design that replaces the traditional wooden planks with steel-reinforced concrete. Pentagram’s Paula Scher and her team have created graphics for the new boardwalk that helps put Rockaway back on the map, literally: The typography announces the beach in letters that are each 100 to 150 feet wide and almost 50 feet tall, and together span nearly a mile.