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New Work: ‘Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt’


Opening titles for “Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt,” the new Netflix comedy from “30 Rock” creators Tina Fey and Robert Carlock.

In the extremely funny “Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt,” the new comedy from “30 Rock” creators Tina Fey and Robert Carlock, the titular heroine is rescued from a doomsday cult after 15 years of living underground and must use her irrepressibly cheery spirit to navigate contemporary New York. Pentagram’s Emily Oberman and her team have designed the identity and opening titles for the show, which debuts today on Netflix.

Played by Ellie Kemper (Erin on “The Office”), Kimmy is the living embodiment of spunk (and normally we hate spunk), a fish-out-of-water who is naïve and sheltered but blissfully well-equipped to deal with any situation, usually with hilarious results. Oberman’s ebullient graphics echo Kimmy’s sunny disposition with bold typography, a bright tween-age color palette, and a generous sprinkling of fairy dust. For the opening titles, the designers collaborated with “songify” artists the Gregory Brothers, who brought their special magic to a beyond-catchy theme song, written by composer Jeff Richmond, and who also created an extended viral-video version of the song.

Equilateral: An Audiovisual Essay in Triangles

Founded in 1962 on humanitarian principles, Al-Dabbagh is a family-run organisation with a unique philosophy that balances earning with philanthropy to deliver impact and scale for the greater good. Having set targets for 2020, Al-Dabbagh asked Naresh Ramchandani and Domenic Lippa to create a film to communicate its unique ecosystem and ambitions.

New Work: Archtober 2014

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It’s no wonder that October is one of our favorite months, what with the favorable weather, colorful leaves, and abounding Halloween candy. But this month is particularly special because it marks Archtober, the month-long annual festival of architecture and design in New York City. Now in its fourth year, Archtober highlights the city’s most compelling architectural and design in a series of tours, discussions, exhibitions, and films sponsored by a number of collaborating institutions. Pentagram partner Luke Hayman and team have designed the identity and exhibition graphics for Archtober 2014, building on the designs the team has developed for the festival since 2011.

New Work: Saturday Night Live’s 40th Anniversary Season


The opening titles for the 40th anniversary season of “Saturday Night Live” introduce a new identity for the show.

NBC’s legendary sketch comedy show “Saturday Night Live” kicks off its 40th anniversary season this fall with a new identity and title sequence designed by Pentagram’s Emily Oberman and team.

From its groundbreaking roots, “Saturday Night Live” has grown into a New York institution, and like the city, endlessly reinvents itself. The new identity and opening titles marry the SNL graphics with the architecture of the city. At the same time, the sequence playfully looks back to the show’s lo-fi days, with flickering graphics inspired by analog technology.

“For this season we wanted the open to be a love letter to New York,” says Oberman. “The city is such an important part of the show we wanted to find a way to get the logo to be part of the city.”

Ho Ho Ho!

Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum celebrates the holidays this year with an animated greeting designed by Pentagram’s Paula Scher, recipient of the 2013 National Design Award for Communication Design. The fast and festive clip spells out Santa’s “Ho, ho, ho” with over 110 different H’s and O’s that appear in typefaces including Bifur, Knox, Leitura Display, Rosewood and the very timely Snowflake, and as objects including cookies, clocks, wreaths, ornaments, snow globes, and more. How many can you identify?

Project Team: Paula Scher, partner-in-charge and designer; Lingxiao Tan, designer.

New Work: Wired Magazine Issue 21.12


Animation created by Eddie Opara for Wired that renders the issue number 21.12 in its binary configuration of 1s and 0s.

In the December 2013 issue of Wired, special guest editor Bill Gates hosts a dialogue with former President Bill Clinton about the power of technology to transform the world. Inspired by the historic pairing, Pentagram’s Eddie Opara and team have created an illustration for the issue that uses binary numbers—the 1s and 0s that are the building blocks of the digital age—as its theme.

Every month Wired invites a different designer or artist to create an image for the opening page of the features well that incorporates the volume and issue number. For December’s issue, No. 21.12, Opara and his team have rendered the number in its binary configuration of 1s and 0s. The designers wanted to represent the number in a way that was not overtly digital, so it appears in the analog form of wooden pegs in round holes. (The illustration was created digitally.)

The team also created an animated version of the design in which the three-dimensional pegs advance and recede to form the number. Originally intended for the app version of the magazine, the animation is seen for the first time here.

New Work: Curly One Productions


Animation of the Curly One Productions logo.

The animated graphic identities that appear at the end of a television show serve as quick, distinctive signatures for the producers behind the program. Pentagram’s Emily Oberman and team have designed the identity for Curly One Productions, the company of the producer Corin Nelson. Oberman recently collaborated with Nelson on the opening titles and graphics for “The Queen Latifah Show”, for which Nelson is one of the executive producers. Nelson is a five-time Emmy Award winner who has executive produced, run or developed a number of series including “Chelsea Lately,” “The Nate Berkus Show,” “The Rosie O’Donnell Show,” “The Sharon Osbourne Show,” and “It’s On With Alexa Chung.”

The Curly One name was inspired by Nelson’s own signature curly locks, and the logo—literally, a “curly” “1,” get it?—is a mix of grit and glamour that sums up her personality: a little bit rock ‘n’ roll, feminine, smart and funny.

“I love to design production company logos because they only appear for two seconds, and so you get to do something cool, fun and memorable for just an instant, and people get to know it over time,” says Oberman. “It’s the Snapchat of logos!”