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Melissa: Making Plastic Glamorous


Melissa is a shoe company based in Brazil that creates extraordinary plastic shoes. Over the past 36 years they have collaborated with Vivienne Westwood, Zaha Hadid, Karl Lagerfield and many others.

Their designs include a broad spectrum of shoes, from simple sandals to extravagant sculptural wedges. Consumed by a huge part of the population in Brazil, they have also found celebrity fans in Katy Perry, Anne Hathaway and Kate Moss.

Pentagram London’s resident Brazilian, Marina Willer and her team have created a summer campaign for the brand, here she explains her return to Rio.

New Work: Choice Works

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Animated version of the Choice Works identity.

Pentagram’s Paula Scher and her team have designed the identity and event graphics for Choice Works, a party and art auction to benefit Planned Parenthood Federation of America and Planned Parenthood of New York City. Support from the event will help provide affordable or free reproductive health care to New Yorkers and fight to protect women’s rights in every state across the U.S.

The auction features artworks donated by leading artists including Cindy Sherman, Laurie Simmons, Marilyn Minter, Jeff Koons, Matthew Barney, Roni Horn, Nan Goldin, Kara Walker, Alex Katz, Richard Serra, Richard Prince, Ryan McGinley, Louise Lawler, Sarah Sze, Dana Schutz, Lisa Yuskavage, and many others. The event will be held at Sotheby’s in New York this Friday, May 15.

New Work: Ten Trinity Square


John Rushworth has developed a brand strategy and visual identity for Ten Trinity Square, a redevelopment of the former Port of London Authority building in the City of London consisting of a private members club, 41 luxury residencies and a Four Seasons hotel. It is the first investment of Chinese conglomerate Reignwood, outside of Asia in super prime real estate.

The brief was to reinvigorate the purpose of the building and create a long-term vision that would also support Reignwood’s future investments in the sector. To do this, the project had to be positioned in a way that recognised its location, architecture and historical importance.

Mulberry: From England With Love


From England with Love is a new 48-page booklet by Mulberry that was designed, edited and written in collaboration with Angus Hyland and his team. The book tells the story of the brand’s heritage, creative philosophy and dedication to English craftsmanship.

Founded in 1971 by Roger Saul with a birthday gift of £500, Mulberry has grown into Britain’s largest manufacturers of leather goods. From their two factories in Somerset they have produced a series of iconic bags, each known for their use of natural leathers, their shapes and their names – Roxanne, Bayswater, Alexa, Lilly and Cara.

Throughout the years, Mulberry’s blend of Somerset’s countryside style and London’s city chic has been influenced by collaborations with fashion’s elite, including Luella Bartley, Giles Deacon, Stuart Vevers, Alexa Chung and Cara Delevingne.

New Work: World Wildlife Fund Gifts

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In 2013 Pentagram’s Austin office created World Wildlife, the new flagship publication for World Wildlife Fund (WWF) based in Washington DC. WWF—the group with the iconic panda logo—is the world’s leading conservation organization. WWF works in 100 countries and is supported by 1.2 million members in the United States and close to 5 million around the world. WWF’s unique way of working combines global reach with a foundation in science, involves action at every level from local to international, and ensures the delivery of innovative solutions that meet the needs of both people and nature.

Now partner DJ Stout and designer Kristen Keiser in Pentagram’s Austin office have redesigned WWF’s gift catalog, WWF’s annual fundraising effort. In addition to gifts like T-shirts and tote bags, WWF supporters are given the opportunity to make symbolic adoptions of wildlife around the world, and based on the level of their donations receive a formal adoption certificate, a species spotlight card, a full-color photo and a soft plush representation of the animal, or animals, they care about. The donations generated by the catalog are used in general support of WWF’s conservation efforts around the world. So far the Winter 2014-2015 gift catalog has increased sales by 10 percent.

New Work: ‘Public Speaking’


In the two decades that Pentagram’s Paula Scher has worked with The Public Theater, there’s one thing she’s never designed for the institution: an annual report.

To celebrate an important season that saw an increase in membership and donors, and as well as the development of several landmark productions, The Public has issued “Public Speaking,” a review of its activities during 2013-2014. Drawing on her iconic identity for The Public, Scher has designed a lively and engaging publication that helps the institution strengthen its relationship with its community and audiences.

New Work: ‘In 80 Dingen um die Welt’


In his classic novel Around the World in 80 Days, French author Jules Verne envisioned the future of travel and globalization bolstered by the technological advances of the late nineteenth century. The current exhibition at the Museum für Kommunikation in Berlin, In 80 Dingen um die Welt: Der Jules-Verne-Code (Around the World in 80 Things: The Jules Verne Code), explores the history of globalization via the route in Verne’s novel, taking visitors on a voyage of discovery around the globe and across time as told through 80 objects directly related to the story.

Pentagram’s Justus Oehler and his team in Berlin have designed the visual identity for the exhibition, which has been applied to posters, leaflets, and outdoor promotional banners. Pentagram also designed the 260-page exhibition catalogue and a series of three billboard posters displayed in subway stations around Berlin.

Gamechanger: A Cautionary Tale of Corporate Jargon


Naresh Ramchandani and Marina Willer explain the thinking behind this year’s Pentagram holiday card. 

We have spent a long time working together and often speak about how, like many other people who do what we do, we have developed an allergy to corporate jargon.

We often laugh at a story from when Naresh worked with a man who, on their very first meeting, said the task he wanted him to achieve was “mission critical.” The task was to add a couple of pages to a corporate site, not to hack through a jungle or to take a ring to a volcano. Was it that critical? Well, given that he only had to amend an ‘About’ page, the failure to do so was neither going to halt the “mission,” —if that’s what it was—or kill anyone in particular.