Pentagram

New at Pentagram

Skip to content

New Work: ‘In 80 Dingen um die Welt’

JO_MfK_01

In his classic novel Around the World in 80 Days, French author Jules Verne envisioned the future of travel and globalization bolstered by the technological advances of the late nineteenth century. The current exhibition at the Museum für Kommunikation in Berlin, In 80 Dingen um die Welt: Der Jules-Verne-Code (Around the World in 80 Things: The Jules Verne Code), explores the history of globalization via the route in Verne’s novel, taking visitors on a voyage of discovery around the globe and across time as told through 80 objects directly related to the story.

Pentagram’s Justus Oehler and his team in Berlin have designed the visual identity for the exhibition, which has been applied to posters, leaflets, and outdoor promotional banners. Pentagram also designed the 260-page exhibition catalogue and a series of three billboard posters displayed in subway stations around Berlin.

Have a Holly Jolly Texmas

JackareindeerFlare_620

A jackalope is a mythical animal that has supposedly been seen hopping across the plains of West Texas for centuries. The story goes that the jackrabbits are so big in that area—“everything is bigger in Texas”—they began mating with the wild antelopes in the region and the jackalope, a jackrabbit with antelope horns, was born. Now partner DJ Stout and designer Barrett Fry in Pentagram’s Austin office have created a version of the mysterious beast just in time for the holidays. Meet the Jackareindeer.

New Work: 443 Greenwich Street

01_logo

Located in New York’s historic North TriBeCa neighborhood, 443 Greenwich Street is a landmark 1882 factory building that is being transformed into luxury residences. Pentagram’s Natasha Jen and her team have designed the brand identity and marketing campaign for the development, which features a distinctive monogram inspired by the building’s unique floor plan and industrial past.

Cooper Hewitt Reopens With Graphics by Pentagram

1 Pentagram Gericke Cooper Hewitt-2955

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum reopens today following a three-year renovation that restores the historic Andrew Carnegie Mansion and increases the museum’s exhibition space by 60 percent. Pentagram’s Michael Gericke and Eddie Opara and their teams have collaborated on the graphics for the revitalized institution, including a bold new graphic identity, website, signage, wayfinding and exhibition graphics.

Michael Gericke and his team developed a vibrant and contemporary signage and environmental graphics program for the mansion’s exterior and interior. The program includes the exterior identity, exhibition directories, wayfinding and donor recognition graphics. The Andrew Carnegie Mansion is a historic landmark and cannot be physically altered, so the team found ways to creatively integrate the signage into the building in an impactful but non-intrusive way.

From Russia With Type

NYTBR_Russia_500

Pentagram’s Paula Scher has created the cover design for this weekend’s edition of The New York Times Book Review, a special issue devoted to the subject of Russia. Inspired by Constructivist typography, Scher’s design suggests the breadth of the issue’s content, which ranges from contemporary Russia to its political history and its relationship with the US. The arrangement of type reads not only as RUSSIA, but also as USSR and USA. (Scher has a longstanding love for Constructivist type and helped revive its use in postmodern design; her iconic Best of Jazz poster turns 35 this year.)

Scher recently designed the cover of another special issue of the Book Review that focused on women and power.

Project Team: Paula Scher, partner-in-charge and designer; Irina Koryagina, designer.

New Work: ‘Malformed’

Malformed_Cover_2_500

An unusual new book designed by Stu Taylor and partner DJ Stout in Pentagram’s Austin office comes out of the closet, literally, on December 2. Published by powerHouse Books, Malformed: Forgotten Brains of the Texas State Mental Hospital features still-life images of brains by Austin-based photographer Adam Voorhes with reporting and essays by Alex Hannaford.

“The book will be out just in time for those hard to shop for Christmas gifts,” quips Stout. “But seriously, these expertly crafted images may not be everyone’s cup of tea, but I think they are fascinating and beautiful in their own right.”