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Last Folio Book: A Photographic Memory


In 2006, serendipity led two former political exiles, photographer Yuri Dojc and documentary producer Katya Krausova, to an abandoned Jewish school in their homeland, Slovakia. Abandoned since 1942, when all its students had been deported to concentration camps, Dojc photographed the building and disintegrating school books within it. These photographs were the beginning of Last Folio, an international travelling exhibition and documentary film.

In commemoration of the 70th anniversary of the end of World War Two, Dojc and Krausova have released a book, Last Folio: A photographic Memory, that documents their exploration into Slovakia’s pre-war Jewish culture.

Auf einer Reise durch ihr Heimatland Slowakei entdeckten Fotograf Yuri Dojc und die Filmemacherin Katya Krausova eher zufällig ein verlassenes, halb verfallenes jüdisches Schulhaus. Als wäre die Zeit stillgestanden seit jenem Tag im Jahr 1942 – als sämtliche Schüler und Lehrer dieser Schule von den Nazis in ein Konzentrationslager deportiert wurden – befanden sich darin noch alle Schulbücher, so, wie sie zurückgelassen worden waren.

Dojc fotografierte das verfallene Gebäude und die darin zurückgebliebenen Schulbücher. Da für Dojc die Bücher allesamt Überlebende einer schrecklichen Zeit waren, versuchte er, sie mit seinen Fotos auch so zu portraitieren. Diese Fotografien waren der Anfang von Last Folio, einer internationalen Wanderausstellung und einem Dokumentarfilm.

Im Gedenken an den 70. Jahrestag des Endes des zweiten Weltkrieges haben Dojc und Krausova nun ein Buch veröffentlicht: Last Folio – ein fotografisches Gedächtnis, das ihre Reise in die jüdisch-slowakische Vorkriegskultur dokumentiert.

‘Last Folio’: A Memorial that Travelled the World


Last Folio – Traces of Jewish Life in Slovakia – an exhibition of photographs by Yuri Dojc, designed by Daniel Weil – has come to Germany for the first time. From 24 April to 27 June 2015, the exhibition will be on display in Staatsbibliothek zu Berlin (National Library of Germany).

The exhibition is part of worldwide commemorations to mark the 70th anniversary of the end of World War II. It came to Berlin from the Mark Rothko Art Centre in Latvia.

New Work: ‘In 80 Dingen um die Welt’


In his classic novel Around the World in 80 Days, French author Jules Verne envisioned the future of travel and globalization bolstered by the technological advances of the late nineteenth century. The current exhibition at the Museum für Kommunikation in Berlin, In 80 Dingen um die Welt: Der Jules-Verne-Code (Around the World in 80 Things: The Jules Verne Code), explores the history of globalization via the route in Verne’s novel, taking visitors on a voyage of discovery around the globe and across time as told through 80 objects directly related to the story.

Pentagram’s Justus Oehler and his team in Berlin have designed the visual identity for the exhibition, which has been applied to posters, leaflets, and outdoor promotional banners. Pentagram also designed the 260-page exhibition catalogue and a series of three billboard posters displayed in subway stations around Berlin.

Gamechanger: A Cautionary Tale of Corporate Jargon


Naresh Ramchandani and Marina Willer explain the thinking behind this year’s Pentagram holiday card. 

We have spent a long time working together and often speak about how, like many other people who do what we do, we have developed an allergy to corporate jargon.

We often laugh at a story from when Naresh worked with a man who, on their very first meeting, said the task he wanted him to achieve was “mission critical.” The task was to add a couple of pages to a corporate site, not to hack through a jungle or to take a ring to a volcano. Was it that critical? Well, given that he only had to amend an ‘About’ page, the failure to do so was neither going to halt the “mission,” —if that’s what it was—or kill anyone in particular.

Well-Designed Gifts for Every Budget Courtesy of Pentagram


It’s December. A month that is full of parties, drinking, deadlines, ironic jumpers and endless poultry. And, the annual crisis of choosing what to buy for your mother, your friends, your colleagues, your neighbour and your significant other

We know time is tight, and that end-of-year shopping is a nightmare, so in the spirit of giving, we’ve made a list of gifts, from Pentagram, to suit every budget.

New Work: JLL


Pentagram’s Justus Oehler and his team in the Berlin office have updated the brand identity of JLL , the global real estate services provider. The new logo accompanies the shortening of the company’s name from Jones Lang LaSalle to JLL.

A leader in its category, JLL specializes in commercial real estate services and investment management and employs 48,000 people in 1,000 locations in 70 countries around the world. The JLL symbol is known as the “Worldmark” and represents a truly global company comprised of multiple strands of expertise working in collaboration. Oehler and his designers have retained the iconic symbol for the refresh, but made it red to help it better stand out and added shading to make it more dimensional.

From Olive Green to Black and White


Founded by Thomas Lommel, an extraordinary man who was once a German army athlete and now speaks with olive trees, Oliveda is a cosmetics company that uses age-old mediterranean recipes to offer high quality natural products. As the company has grown and acquired other brands including Bio Revital AG, Oliveda has ambitions to expand into 20 new countries and was looking for a complete relaunch of the brand. Pentagram’s Justus Oehler was approached to design the logo, packaging, website and communication materials.

New Work: ‘Coyote v. Acme’


In his never-ending quest to capture the Road Runner, Wile E. Coyote has been a faithful customer of the Acme Company, whose products—Spherical Bombs, Rocket Skates, Spring-Powered Shoes—invariably fail him at the worst possible time. Pentagram’s Daniel Weil has reimagined designs for five of these gadgets, rendered as a series of highly detailed technical diagrams. The drawings were inspired by Ian Frazier’s classic humor essay Coyote v. Acme and accompany a republishing of the article for Pentagram’s annual holiday card.