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From Olive Green to Black and White

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Founded by Thomas Lommel, an extraordinary man who was once a German army athlete and now speaks with olive trees, Oliveda is a cosmetics company that uses age-old mediterranean recipes to offer high quality natural products. As the company has grown and acquired other brands including Bio Revital AG, Oliveda has ambitions to expand into 20 new countries and was looking for a complete relaunch of the brand. Pentagram’s Justus Oehler was approached to design the logo, packaging, website and communication materials.

New Work: ‘Coyote v. Acme’

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In his never-ending quest to capture the Road Runner, Wile E. Coyote has been a faithful customer of the Acme Company, whose products—Spherical Bombs, Rocket Skates, Spring-Powered Shoes—invariably fail him at the worst possible time. Pentagram’s Daniel Weil has reimagined designs for five of these gadgets, rendered as a series of highly detailed technical diagrams. The drawings were inspired by Ian Frazier’s classic humor essay Coyote v. Acme and accompany a republishing of the article for Pentagram’s annual holiday card.

A New Tea Identity

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Have you ever had a great cup of tea at a music festival?

YANG CHAI is a new brand from a Munich-based entrepreneur which sources and creates new tea varieties and then makes them available at festivals, at open air markets and through an online shop.

YANG CHAI targets a young, design-conscious audience and therefore wanted to provide an alternative to the current tea brand trends. “We wanted to position this brand well away from the ‘homely’ or ‘organic’ looking tea brands which have come to the market in recent years”, says Justus Oehler, Pentagram partner.

New Work: Forgotten Jewish Architects

In 1933, two years after Hitler came to power, Jewish citizens were persecuted and victimised across Germany. All Jewish citizens were forced to stop trading, and amongst them were 500 architects. Some managed to flee, others were deported and killed in concentration camps. Many architects who were once well-known are now forgotten and their works have been altered or destroyed.

New Work: Rolls-Royce

The 83rd International Geneva Motor Show was a landmark event for Rolls Royce, with the launch of their new Wraith, which the carmaker calls the “most potent and technologically advanced” in its history. Justus Oehler and his team designed the customer experience for their exhibition space, building on his work with the company over the last two years and creating a narrative and a monolithic expression for the brand, encapsulating style and elegance.

The space was multifaceted, featuring a large lounge with a seating and bar area, an atelier, a sales area and glass cabinets with after-sales items. All areas were gathered around a Rolls-Royce car, a focal point in the space. Oehler designed the atelier shelves, with all its original pieces sourced from the Rolls-Royce workshops and factory. He also designed the information graphics and selected the materials needed to develop the overall look and feel of the space, collaborating with Puchner P3 architects based in Munich.

New Work: ‘Sketches of Spain’

Justus Oehler and his team have designed the cover for the new edition of “Sketches of Spain” by esteemed Spanish poet and dramatist Federico Garcia Lorca.

Written in 1918, the book features a series of meditations on Spanish art, landscapes and history. This latest publication by Serif publishers is the first time that the highly acclaimed book has ever been published in the UK.

New Work: ‘Martin Scorsese’ at Deutsche Kinemathek

This spring the Deutsche Kinemathek — Museum für Film and Fernsehen in Berlin presents Martin Scorsese, the first major exhibition about the visionary American director of films including Mean Streets, Taxi Driver, Raging Bull, Goodfellas, The Departed, Hugo, among many others. The exhibition was principally compiled from Scorsese’s private collection in New York, as well as the collections of his frequent collaborators Robert De Niro and Paul Schrader, housed at the Harry Ransom Center at the University of Texas at Austin.

Pentagram partner Justus Oehler and designer David Steingrüber in the Berlin office have designed the identity and communications campaign for the exhibition. The core element is a graphic device that transforms Scorsese’s name into a prism-like sculptural image, created by layering the typography and making it transparent, and by integrating a portrait of the director. The campaign complements the graphic identity and previous campaigns Oehler has created for the museum.