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New Work: ‘Circular 18’

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Circular is the members magazine of The Typographic Circle, the non-profit, all-volunteer organisation for anyone with an interest in type and typography. Designed by Pentagram’s Domenic Lippa and Jeremy Kunze, the latest issue of the publication, Circular 18, puts type front and center with a layout that is almost entirely typographic. Circular 18 is the tenth consecutive issue designed by Lippa and his team.

The Typographic Circle prides itself on providing a platform for a number of voices, and is known for its series of diverse monthly lectures by leading industry figures, as well as the London presentation of the annual New York Type Directors Club exhibition. Speakers at Circle events have included Trevor Beattie, Stefan Sagmeister, Ken Garland, Jonathan Barnborook, Anthony Burrill, Rick Poynor and Sir John Hegarty, among others. Lippa has had a long-standing relationship with the organisation, having served on the committee for many years and also as its Chair.

These many different voices come into play in the new Circular. Each edition of Circular is individually designed, giving Lippa and his designers an opportunity to explore different typographic solutions. The previous issue, Circular 17 (from 2011), was completely visual. For the new issue, Lippa wanted to create a design that was predominantly typographic. Titled “Words & Images,” the new issue features a series of interviews with previous guest speakers conducted by Lippa himself, as well as other members of the Circle executive committee, including current chairperson Alan Dye of NB Studio, Louise Sloper and Val Kildea.

A Smaller Symbol

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A miniature edition of Symbol is due to be published in August. Authored by Pentagram partner Angus Hyland, with Steven Bateman, it condenses the appeal of the original 2011 book into a new, smaller format.

“The idea behind the book is to explore the visual language of symbols according to their most basic element: form,” Hyland writes. “We have brought together symbols conceived all over the world, in different times and for different purposes, and categorized them by visual types.”

The book lays these symbols out in a manner divested of all agendas, meanings, and messages that might be given by their customary contexts, isolating them so that the reader can enjoy them as a pictorial language in their own right.

Type Dancing: A Visual Identity for Riotous Company

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Pentagram’s Harry Pearce and his team have created a new visual identity and a series of performance materials for Riotous Company, the dance and theatre group that creates large-scale performances and chamber pieces with a worldwide collective of composers, dancers, singers, actors, writers and visual artists. Riotous Company’s work has been created in collaboration with leading companies and festivals in South Africa, Cuba, Nepal, Palestine, Portugal, Macedonia, Denmark and the UK.

The logotype was created by staging the typography, manually building a miniature stage and allowing the type to perform. The core idea of type integrating with performance weaves through all the poster work and becomes the visual language for the brand.