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New Work: Montague Street Business Improvement District

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Located in the heart of Brooklyn Heights, Montague Street is one of Brooklyn’s most charming downtown streets and an important commercial corridor that hosts a mix of more than 100 shops, restaurants and services along tree-lined blocks of architecturally historic buildings and residences. Pentagram’s Emily Oberman and her team have designed a new identity for the Montague Street Business Improvement District, the not-for-profit organization with the mission of making the street a great place to work, live and shop.

Oberman and her team worked closely with the BID’s Executive Director Brigit Pinnell to develop the identity. Oberman knows Montague Street well, having called it home for the past 8 years.

New Work: Taiwan Pavilion at the Venice Architecture Biennale

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Domesticity is perhaps one of the most fundamental beginnings of architecture—realized as bedrooms, dining rooms, bathrooms, dressing rooms, etc.—each devoted to a programmatic specificity. The Taiwan Pavilion at the 2014 Venice Architecture Biennale explores the idea of private domesticity inverted as public space in the exhibition Township of Domestic Parts: Made in Taiwan. Curated and designed by the noted architect Jimenez Lai, the pavilion is a collection of nine small houses, each embodying one domestic program. Pentagram’s Natasha Jen and her team have designed an identity for the exhibition that showcases the theme in a lively mix of colorful graphics and custom typography, both in English and Chinese.

Lai’s pavilion design is a response to the official Biennale theme of “Fundamentals,” set out by the Biennale’s chief curator, Rem Koolhaas. Scattered within the gallery of the Palazzo delle Prigioni, the pavilion’s collection of small houses forms an interior township of misfit parts. Each structure stands for one domestic activity or program, such as the House of Sleep (the bedroom), the House of Social Eating (the dining room), the House of Shit (the bathroom), and so on. The various houses are embodied by frame-like, freestanding structures that Lai calls “superfurniture.”

New Work: Penguin Press

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Founded in 2003 by the esteemed editor Ann Godoff, Penguin Press is an imprint of Penguin that publishes literary fiction and quality non-fiction by a distinguished list of authors that includes Thomas Pynchon, Zadie Smith, Ron Chernow, John Berendt, Michael Pollan and Errol Morris, among many others. Pentagram’s Michael Bierut and his team have designed a new identity for Penguin Press that establishes an iconic symbol for the imprint. Bierut and his designers also recently developed the new brand identity for Penguin Random House, Penguin’s parent company.

New Work: ‘Golf Digest’

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Golf is played by nearly 30 million Americans, but the sport still has the image of an old-man’s game. Golf Digest, the most widely read golf publication in the world, recently introduced a new format designed to connect with millennial golfers (ages 25-34)—the magazine’s fastest growing segment of readership—as well as the traditional core golfer (age 50-plus). Designed by Pentagram’s Luke Hayman and team, the update refreshes the Condé Nast publication with a contemporary format that captures the excitement, energy and style of the sport.

Hayman and his team worked closely with Golf Digest creative director Ken DeLago and editor-in-chief Jerry Tarde on the redesign. The new look complements an editorial shift that includes more lifestyle content, intended to appeal to a wider audience (and the advertisers looking to reach them). The format opens up the magazine for a looser, more playful feel that conveys the game’s athleticism and virtuosity, as well as the growing “cool” of golf culture, embodied by player-fans like Justin Timberlake and Jimmy Fallon. For the designers, part of the challenge was finding new methods to visually represent the subject—to break up the monotony of pictures of golf course greens against the bright blue sky, or to show golf tips like swing paths in an unexpected way.

WalkNYC Pedestrian Wayfinding Wins IDSA Award

Pentagram is happy to announce the WalkNYC program of pedestrian signage has found its way to a Silver in the prestigious International Design Excellence Awards (IDEA), presented by the Industrial Designers Society of America (IDSA).

A project of the New York City Department of Transportation, WalkNYC makes it easier for New Yorkers and visitors alike to navigate the city streets and encourages people to walk, bike and use public transit. Pentagram’s Michael Bierut and his team designed the graphic language of the maps, collaborating on the project as part of PentaCityGroup, a special consortium of designers that also includes wayfinding specialists CityID, industrial designers Billings Jackson Design, engineers and urban planners RBA Group, and cartographers and geographic information specialists T-Kartor.

IDEA recognizes design excellence in products, interaction design, service design, strategy and research in categories ranging from automobiles and commercial products to medical equipment and digital design. WalkNYC was awarded in the Environments category and was cited for innovation, benefits to the user and sustainability, as well as visual appeal.

Preview: Philadelphia Museum of Art

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Pentagram’s Paula Scher has designed a bold new identity for the Philadelphia Museum of Art that puts “art” front and center. Iconic and expressive, the logo customizes the letter “A” in the word “art” to highlight the breadth of the Museum’s remarkable collection. The identity launches this week with the unveiling of plans for a major renewal and expansion of the Museum by the celebrated architect Frank Gehry.

One of the largest museums in the United States, the Philadelphia Museum of Art has a world-class collection of more than 227,000 works and more than 200 galleries presenting painting, sculpture, works on paper, decorative arts, textiles, and architectural settings from Asia, Europe, Latin America, and the United States. The Museum’s Greek Revival-style Main Building is one of Philadelphia’s great landmarks, and its 10-acre campus anchors the western end of the city’s Benjamin Franklin Parkway.