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New Work: The Little Book of Typographic Ornament


Typographic ornaments are the jewellery of the printed world, providing flourishes over and above what is needed. Ranging from rules to borders to printers’ flowers, they are visual garnishes which do not aid the function of a printed object. Rather, they provide a stylistic treat for the eyes that run alongside a narrative.

The Little Book of Typographic Ornament is a celebration of these graphic decorations, conceived by Angus Hyland and including examples from 1700 up until present day.

Introducing New Partners: Luke Powell and Jody Hudson-Powell


On 1st October Pentagram London welcomed Luke Powell and Jody Hudson-Powell as partners. To celebrate, we invited clients, collaborators and friends to meet Luke and Jody over champagne, canapés and swing music. Luke and Jody join Pentagram from Hudson-Powell, a studio that they founded in 2005. Over the past decade they have developed a varied portfolio encompassing graphic design, identity creation, creative technology and immersive experiences. Alongside his work at Hudson-Powell, Jody also held the position of Design Director at international branding agency Wolff Olins.

New Work: ‘No Problem: Cologne/New York 1984-1989’


In the 1980s, New York and Cologne were twin cities of the contemporary art world, a pair of visionary local art scenes who were engaged in an intercity cultural dialogue that helped produce many of the generation’s most influential artists and galleries. This remarkable era is explored in No Problem: Cologne/New York 1984-1989, a new publication from David Zwirner Books. Pentagram’s Michael Bierut and Laitsz Ho have created a design for the book that reflects the exuberant spirit of the period and its art.

The book follows the 2014 exhibition of the same name at David Zwirner, one of the first surveys to look at the connection between the two cities. In the 1980s, art being produced in and around Cologne started gaining international attention, and a growing gallery scene supported emerging work from the region and beyond. German artists such as Martin Kippenberger, Rosemarie Trockel and Albert Oehlen were exhibited along with the latest contemporary art from the U.S. by artists like Jeff Koons, Richard Prince, Cindy Sherman, Raymond Pettibon, Richard Prince and Christopher Wool. At the same time, New York galleries such as Metro Pictures and Barbara Gladstone were showing the works of German artists. This cross-fertilization helped shape the vibrant art and visual culture of the period and decades since.