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New Work: ‘In 80 Dingen um die Welt’

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In his classic novel Around the World in 80 Days, French author Jules Verne envisioned the future of travel and globalization bolstered by the technological advances of the late nineteenth century. The current exhibition at the Museum für Kommunikation in Berlin, In 80 Dingen um die Welt: Der Jules-Verne-Code (Around the World in 80 Things: The Jules Verne Code), explores the history of globalization via the route in Verne’s novel, taking visitors on a voyage of discovery around the globe and across time as told through 80 objects directly related to the story.

Pentagram’s Justus Oehler and his team in Berlin have designed the visual identity for the exhibition, which has been applied to posters, leaflets, and outdoor promotional banners. Pentagram also designed the 260-page exhibition catalogue and a series of three billboard posters displayed in subway stations around Berlin.

And Don’t Forget to Change the World

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Naresh Ramchandani explores how every piece of creative work can do good. 

Stuck to my psyche is a post-it note reminding me of the kind of work I always want to do. On the note are the words ‘… and don’t forget to change the world.’ It’s a pretty big phrase for a small imaginary post-it but it’s there to remind me that, every time I make a piece of creative work, I have the choice to make the world a little better or a little worse with that work, and the second option is not an option.

College Football Playoff Wins Big

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Last night Ohio State triumphed over Oregon 42-20 to win the inaugural College Football Playoff National Championship game at AT&T Stadium in Arlington, TX. Watched by a capacity crowd of 85,689 in the stands and a cable television record of 33.4 million viewers—ESPN’s largest audience and highest overnight rating ever—the game represents a stunning success for the new era in college football.

Pentagram’s Michael Gericke and his team created an iconic trophy and visual identity to build the foundation for the new four-team playoff and raise its profile in the national conversation. The designs were fundamental elements in shaping every aspect of a mega sports event that combines the excitement of a tournament with a championship game on par with the Super Bowl.

Sleek and contemporary, the 24-karat gold, bronze and stainless steel trophy expands on the identity originally created by Michael Gericke and Matt McInerney for College Football Playoff. The symbol’s two rising brackets represent the coming together of the best teams in the playoff system and form the shape of a virtual football—the four laces of the ball portray the four playoff teams.

Healing U.S. Healthcare

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In his new high-profile book America’s Bitter Pill, the journalist and media entrepreneur Steven Brill explores the complex issues around American health care and healthcare reform, from the hard-won fight for the Affordable Care Act to the inner workings of Big Pharma, hospital pricing and the insurance industry. Pentagram’s Michael Bierut and his team have created a pair of striking illustrations for the cover story on the book in this week’s New York Times Book Review, using adhesive bandages to form images of the United States and the American flag.

To create the illustrations, Bierut and Pentagram designer Britt Cobb collected stock images of bandages and painstakingly placed them at various sizes to form a silhouette of the continental US (made with 272 bandages) for the cover and the Stars and Stripes (72 bandages) for an interior spread. The country’s diversity of healthcare approaches is reflected in the sheer variety of bandages, from typical “Band-Aid”-style strips of different colors to unusual shapes like butterfly and spot bandages.