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New Work: GLUCK+

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The innovative New York based architecture firm GLUCK+ is a pioneer of Architect Led Design Build (ALDB), an integrated strategy that makes architects responsible for all aspects of the architectural process, from conception to construction. An alternative to the traditional design-bid-build process, ALDB puts the same people in charge of an entire project, resulting in better quality and cost of the finished building. Pentagram’s Eddie Opara and his team have collaborated with GLUCK+ on a comprehensive rebranding that highlights the firm’s multi-disciplinary approach in the new GLUCK+ name and identity, as well as a dynamic new website.

New Work: ‘Color Works’

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From establishing the tone of a brand to setting the mood for an environment, color is an inherent and invaluable component of graphic design—one that designers often use intuitively, without even recognizing it. Pentagram’s Eddie Opara has created a comprehensive new reference for using color in design, Color Works: An Essential Guide to Understanding and Applying Color Design Principles, out now from Rockport. Co-written with John Cantwell, the book is a highly readable primer on everything designers need to know about color, from scientific theory to cultural significance. It also features case studies by leading designers about their most colorful projects, including essays by Stefan Sagmeister, Paula Scher, Michael Rock, Brian Collins, Tony Brook, Gael Towey, karlssonwilker and Matt Pyke (Universal Everything), among others.

New Work: Wired Magazine Issue 21.12


Animation created by Eddie Opara for Wired that renders the issue number 21.12 in its binary configuration of 1s and 0s.

In the December 2013 issue of Wired, special guest editor Bill Gates hosts a dialogue with former President Bill Clinton about the power of technology to transform the world. Inspired by the historic pairing, Pentagram’s Eddie Opara and team have created an illustration for the issue that uses binary numbers—the 1s and 0s that are the building blocks of the digital age—as its theme.

Every month Wired invites a different designer or artist to create an image for the opening page of the features well that incorporates the volume and issue number. For December’s issue, No. 21.12, Opara and his team have rendered the number in its binary configuration of 1s and 0s. The designers wanted to represent the number in a way that was not overtly digital, so it appears in the analog form of wooden pegs in round holes. (The illustration was created digitally.)

The team also created an animated version of the design in which the three-dimensional pegs advance and recede to form the number. Originally intended for the app version of the magazine, the animation is seen for the first time here.

Pentagram Designs Posters for InsideOut SF

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The charm and beauty of San Francisco have inspired countless artists and designers and earned it acclaim as the best and happiest city in America, not to mention the most romantic. (We know we love it.) To celebrate the city, AIGA San Francisco has curated InsideOut SF, an exhibition and silent auction of original poster designs that highlight personal impressions of the city. The show features new posters by Bay Area-based designers, photographers and illustrators (the “Inside” perspective), as well as some of the most influential creatives from around the world (the “Out”). Pentagram’s Natasha Jen, Eddie Opara, John Rushworth, Paula Scher and Marina Willer have all contributed designs for the event. (Check out the full list of contributors here.) Proceeds from the sale will benefit the San Francisco chapter of AIGA, with funds going towards scholarships, educational programming and community events, such as SF Design Week.

The posters will be exhibited and auctioned at the AIGA SF Fall Gala on Tuesday, November 12 at Terra Gallery, 511 Harrison Street in San Francisco. Get your tickets here.

New Work: ‘Terra Nova’

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The US spends roughly $1 billion a day overseas on foreign oil instead of investing the funds at home, where the economy badly needs it. At the same time, our dependence on oil from unstable countries endangers national security, and carbon dioxide emissions from burning oil contribute to climate change. In Terra Nova: The New World After Oil, Cars, and Suburbs, the scientist Eric W. Sanderson looks at how three powerful forces that drove American prosperity for the better part of a century are now detrimentally affecting the country’s quality of life. The book is a sequel of sorts to Mannahatta, Sanderson’s reimagining of what the island of Manhattan was like before the first settlers arrived. In Terra Nova, he looks ahead, and with a larger scope, envisioning what the US would be like if our dependence on oil, automobiles and urban sprawl were to end, and a new ecology was formed that valued the land, encouraged well-designed cities, and depended on America’s natural advantages in resources like wind, sun and heat, as well as ingenuity.

Pentagram’s Eddie Opara and team have created a design for Terra Nova that helps the book make its case through a clear, cogent layout and a series of 72 highly detailed diagrams. Sanderson’s writing is smart, creative and lively, and Opara has developed a corollary in engaging, user-friendly information graphics that complement the highly readable text. More than supplemental illustrations, the data visualizations are a key element of the book, helping Sanderson construct his arguments and communicate his vision.