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New Work: The Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew

Kew_blog_1

London is the greenest city in Europe, and a huge part of this greenery can be found in The Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. Founded in 1759 and declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 2003, Kew is the world’s largest collection of living plants, a botanical research centre and one of London’s most popular visitor attractions.

Kew epitomises many aspect of what makes London unique, with its sprawling green space, its royal heritage and dedication to innovative research. Harry Pearce and team have created a new identity for the gardens, which brings all these qualities to the fore.

Preview: Shooting Ai Weiwei

Ai-Weiwei

Harry Pearce shares insights into a recent trip to Beijing where he photographed renowned artist Ai Weiwei as part of his upcoming exhibition at the Royal Academy. 

I could so easily have just used an existing shot of Ai Weiwei, or a piece of his work for the identity of the Royal Academy show this coming September.

But I wanted to honour him in a far greater way. His inability to leave China and be a part of the show itself meant, I believed, I should go to him. To make something with him and bring it back – so symbolically bringing him here.

New Work: Lloyd’s of London

Lloyds_Case_study

Lloyd’s of London is the world’s specialist insurance market, conducting business in over 200 countries worldwide. Established in 1871, Lloyd’s is synonymous with London’s skyline and is based in the landmark Inside-Out building by Richard Rogers. Every year, Lloyd’s generates an annual report to send to key stakeholders. The latest edition, which is both print and digital, has been designed by Harry Pearce and team and covers the financial year of 2014.

Pearce’s brief was to create a report that used the Lloyd’s pre-existing brand guidelines, whilst being a significant departure from annual reports of previous years. The report needed to be more than a financial brochure, it had to have an editorial and utilitarian feel.

A Pentagram Production: The Poems of Henry Ponder

Naresh Ramchandani explains how we came to make a short film about one of Britain’s most thoughtful, but lesser known, poets. 

I don’t know about you, but my life affords me barely any time to think. The amount of attention I give to my family, my work and to my other duties and pleasures – all manifest through unending calls, meetings, texts, emails and to do lists which never seem to shorten – leaves me precious little time for contemplation. It wasn’t always so.

When I was younger, I used to consider the world around me, and notice things, and think things, such as no matter when you reach a place, your nose will have got there first, or the fact that a stopped clock will tell the right time twice a day. These were not idle thoughts but simple reflections on a world which I had time to attend to, be mindful of and curious about.

That’s why it was such a pleasure last year to discover a minor poet by the name of Henry Ponder, a man tweeting very short daily poems in which he contemplated his everyday world. Henry wrote about the restorative nature of sweeping a floor, and the brusqueness of the language of warning signs, and the inner-softness and vulnerability of a pain au raisin, and more. As I followed his poems, they became mini-mediations not just in his day but mine, reminding me think beyond my immediate preoccupations; reminding me to stop and smell life’s proverbial flowers.

I decided that this unknown poet deserved to be better known. I contacted him on Twitter and arranged to meet him. In person, he was a small, shy man shy with unkempt hair and thick-rimmed glasses. When I suggested the idea of making a very short film about him, he thought for a while, and then said “That would be kind.”