Pentagram

New at Pentagram

Skip to content

New Work: ‘Szenasy, Design Advocate’

PS Szenasy

For more than 30 years, the writer and educator Susan S. Szenasy has led the charge for ethical, sustainable and human-centered design. As editor in chief of the groundbreaking magazine Metropolis, Szenasy has guided and influenced generations of designers, architects, builders, manufacturers, journalists, educators and students. Szenasy, Design Advocate (Metropolis Books) is the first published collection of Szenasy’s writings. Edited by Ann S. Hudner, Akiko Busch, and Angela Riechers, the book includes editorials, reviews, stories, profiles, presentations, lectures, addresses, and even tweets. Pentagram’s Paula Scher has created a design for the book that conveys the revolutionary point of view of Szenasy’s writing and advocacy.

Szenasy will join Debbie Millman for a conversation and reception at the Museum of Arts and Design in New York tonight, March 20, at 7 pm. The event is free and open to the public with the museum’s pay-what-you-wish admission.

29 Posters For The Planet

How do you get people to live more sustainably? You inspire them. That’s the principle at the heart of Do The Green Thing, the environmental charity co-founded by Pentagram’s Naresh Ramchandani.

This month Do The Green Thing is partnering with WWF to release 29 Posters For The Planet, 29 pieces of inspiring creativity published daily in the run up to Earth Hour on March 29th. Contributors to the 29 Posters include Pentagram partners Paula Scher, Harry Pearce, Abbott Miller and Natasha Jen.

Paula Scher, in her poster above, sees a satanic side to our over-plugged lives, so she has created a devilish image and message, adopting the idiom of a 1940s civil action poster to inspire us to use less energy.

Ho Ho Ho!

Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum celebrates the holidays this year with an animated greeting designed by Pentagram’s Paula Scher, recipient of the 2013 National Design Award for Communication Design. The fast and festive clip spells out Santa’s “Ho, ho, ho” with over 110 different H’s and O’s that appear in typefaces including Bifur, Knox, Leitura Display, Rosewood and the very timely Snowflake, and as objects including cookies, clocks, wreaths, ornaments, snow globes, and more. How many can you identify?

Project Team: Paula Scher, partner-in-charge and designer; Lingxiao Tan, designer.

New Work: Natural Areas Conservancy

NAC_opening-1

New York City is known for its canyons of concrete, but the metropolitan area also encompasses over 5,300 acres of forests and 3,100 acres of wetlands and river systems. (Altogether, New York City’s natural parkland would fill Manhattan from the Battery to 125th Street in Harlem.) The Natural Areas Conservancy is an affiliate of the New York City Department of Parks and Recreation with the mission to protect, restore, and manage the expansive natural areas already within the city’s urban park system. Pentagram’s Paula Scher has created a new identity for the organization that brings the beauty of these spaces to the fore.

The identity utilizes photography to show exactly what the Natural Areas Conservancy is trying to preserve. The program uses photographs by Joel Meyerowitz that were originally commissioned by NYC Parks for the 2009 book Legacy: The Preservation of Wilderness in New York City Parks. Scher suggested the images be used for the Natural Areas identity, and Meyerowitz gave access to the photos as a gift to the city.

“People see Joel’s photos and say, ‘That’s New York City?,’” says Scher.

Pentagram Designs Posters for InsideOut SF

AIGA_InsideOutSF_JohnRushworth

The charm and beauty of San Francisco have inspired countless artists and designers and earned it acclaim as the best and happiest city in America, not to mention the most romantic. (We know we love it.) To celebrate the city, AIGA San Francisco has curated InsideOut SF, an exhibition and silent auction of original poster designs that highlight personal impressions of the city. The show features new posters by Bay Area-based designers, photographers and illustrators (the “Inside” perspective), as well as some of the most influential creatives from around the world (the “Out”). Pentagram’s Natasha Jen, Eddie Opara, John Rushworth, Paula Scher and Marina Willer have all contributed designs for the event. (Check out the full list of contributors here.) Proceeds from the sale will benefit the San Francisco chapter of AIGA, with funds going towards scholarships, educational programming and community events, such as SF Design Week.

The posters will be exhibited and auctioned at the AIGA SF Fall Gala on Tuesday, November 12 at Terra Gallery, 511 Harrison Street in San Francisco. Get your tickets here.

New Work: National Theatre

NT50_PosterRT_400

To celebrate its 50th anniversary this year, the National Theatre in London invited five internationally renowned graphic designers to each create a poster that represents one of the NT’s five decades. Pentagram’s Paula Scher has designed a poster that features custom typography inspired by the NT’s original home at the Old Vic. Other participating designers include David Carson, Michael Craig-Martin, Graphic Thought Facility and Jamie Reid. Each of the 20″ x 30″ (508mm x 762mm) signed prints has been published in a limited edition of 200 and is available for purchase at “Shopping and E*ting,” a special pop-up shop at the NT’s home on the South Bank, as well as online. Scher’s design is also available as a greeting card and tote bag. The pop-up launches today and remains open through 12 January.

Project Team: Paula Scher, partner-in-charge and designer; Jeff Close, designer.

New Work: Jazz at Lincoln Center

JALC_font_final_001_620

Ten years ago Pentagram’s Paula Scher designed the graphic identity for Jazz at Lincoln Center, the country’s premier institution for jazz performance. Now Scher has revisited her classic identity with an update that riffs on the existing logo and expands it into custom typography for the institution.

The refreshed identity simplifies the original wordmark to make it more contemporary. The original identity accompanied Jazz at Lincoln Center’s 2004 move into its home at the Time Warner Center on Columbus Circle, several blocks away from Lincoln Center proper. Now that Jazz is recognized as a major cultural institution in its own right, the update clears away the “at Lincoln Center” and leaves the organization as exactly what it is: Jazz.