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New Work: ‘The New York Times Book Review’

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The New York Times Book Review has commissioned Pentagram’s Paula Scher to design the cover for a special issue on women and power. Published with the paper’s Sunday, October 12 edition, the section features reviews of new books by female authors including Lena Dunham, Gail Sheehy and Katha Pollitt, among others, as well as essays about influential women including Kirsten Gillibrand, Sonia Sotomayor and Caitlin Moran. For the cover image, Scher created a graphic pattern that is both spiky and soft, with lines that radiate from the title typography.

Project Team: Paula Scher, partner-in-charge and designer; Rory Simms, designer.

Awards: AIGA Justified 2014

NYC Beaches, Signage

AIGA’s Justified competition honors clear and compelling design that balances specificity with accessibility and effectiveness. The entries for Justified are submitted as case studies rather than as a series of design artifacts, an approach that showcases the creative process to solving clients’ design problems while demonstrating the value of design. A record number of entries were submitted for the fourth annual competition this year, and we are proud to announce that two of Pentagram’s projects have been chosen as winners.

The identity and environmental graphics program designed by Paula Scher and her team for the restored New York City Beaches was selected as one of Justified’s 19 winners, as was the extensive WalkNYC pedestrian wayfinding system developed by PentaCityGroup, a special consortium of designers that included Michael Bierut and team.

New Work: The Public Theater 2014-2015 Campaign

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The campaign for the 2014-2015 season at the Public uses dynamically skewed typography.

Pentagram’s Paula Scher puts a new slant on her iconic identity for the Public Theater in the campaign for the institution’s 2014-2015 season, launching this month. Designed with Kirstin Huber, Senior Graphic Designer at the Public, promotions for the upcoming slate of productions use skewed typography for a dynamic take on the theater’s signature look. The campaign marks the 20th anniversary of Scher’s continuing collaboration with the Public.

New Work: National Center for Civil and Human Rights

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The National Center for Civil and Human Rights is a new museum that connects the American Civil Rights Movement with current struggles for human rights around the world. Located near Centennial Olympic Park in downtown Atlanta, the Center harnesses the city’s legacy as a birthplace of civil rights activism to encourage visitors to think about the role they can play in protecting human rights.

Pentagram’s Paula Scher has designed a large-scale mural for the museum lobby that pays homage to the graphics of rights movements and brings them together in a bold new composition centered on a raised human hand. The installation has inspired its own viral mini-movement: Visitors are showing solidarity with the mural’s message by sharing images of their own “high fives” on social media.

Preview: Philadelphia Museum of Art

New identity

Pentagram’s Paula Scher has designed a bold new identity for the Philadelphia Museum of Art that puts “art” front and center. Iconic and expressive, the logo customizes the letter “A” in the word “art” to highlight the breadth of the Museum’s remarkable collection. The identity launches this week with the unveiling of plans for a major renewal and expansion of the Museum by the celebrated architect Frank Gehry.

One of the largest museums in the United States, the Philadelphia Museum of Art has a world-class collection of more than 227,000 works and more than 200 galleries presenting painting, sculpture, works on paper, decorative arts, textiles, and architectural settings from Asia, Europe, Latin America, and the United States. The Museum’s Greek Revival-style Main Building is one of Philadelphia’s great landmarks, and its 10-acre campus anchors the western end of the city’s Benjamin Franklin Parkway.