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Fifteen Years of Serpentine Pavilions


The identity of the Build Your Own Pavilion campaign

On Thursday 24 June 2015, SelgasCano’s Serpentine Pavilion will open to the public. This is the fifteenth year of the Summer Pavilion, during which the Serpentine Galleries have commissioned some of the world’s most renowned architects, including Zaha Hadid, Frank Gehry and Herzog & de Meuron, to create their own structures in Hyde Park.

To celebrate fifteen years of Pavilions, the Serpentine Galleries have launched Build Your Own Pavilion: Young Architects Challenge, a digital platform and nationwide campaign to encourage the future generation of aspiring architects. Marina Willer and team have created an identity for the campaign that appeals to its primary audience, 8-14 year olds.

Preview: The Bridge at Cornell Tech


Teaser video for The Bridge at Cornell Tech.

Construction kicked off this week on Cornell Tech, the $2 billion, 17-acre campus for technology on Roosevelt Island in New York City. Pentagram’s Michael Bierut and his team are designing the identity for The Bridge at Cornell Tech, an innovative corporate co-location building on campus that will bring together students, companies, researchers and entrepreneurs to collaborate and interact, all under one roof.

Developed by Forest City Ratner Companies and designed by Weiss/Manfredi, the Bridge is the centerpiece of Cornell Tech and is conceived as an incubator that connects—or “bridges”—the gap between academia and industry leaders. The seven-story, 200,000-square-foot building will contain loft-like spaces where students and entrepreneurs can work with stunning views of Midtown Manhattan as the backdrop. Cornell Tech is set to occupy one third of the building, with a mix of startups and larger companies in the rest. The campus also includes an academic building and residential building, and is scheduled to open in summer 2017.

To launch The Bridge, Bierut and his team created a teaser video that highlights the idea of connection. The clip pictures a series of graphic intersections, then pulls back to reveal the Bridge logotype, set in the distinctive, tech-inspired font Three Six by Muir McNeil. The visuals are accompanied by propulsive music composed by Jacob Rosati.

Additional coverage: Fast Company.

Project Team: Michael Bierut, partner-in-charge, designer and writer; Hamish Smyth, associate and designer; Todd Goldstein, designer. Music by Jacob Rosati.

New Work: ‘Philadelphia Explained’

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In her typographic map paintings, Pentagram’s Paula Scher explores ideas of location and individual ways of seeing the world. Now, working in collaboration with students at her alma mater, the Tyler School of Art, Scher has expanded this unique point of view to an immersive environment. Philadelphia Explained is a large-scale installation that details the city and its surrounding areas in a hand-painted map created by Scher and 154 participants that covers the walls and floor of Temple Contemporary, the school’s 2,100 square-foot gallery.

Melba: Offering a Glimpse into Life at The Savoy

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Every year 45 million people pass through London’s North Bank area and its most famous street, The Strand. Since 1889, The Savoy has been one of The Strand’s most prominent and exclusive businesses, only accessible through the private Savoy Place road. Famed for its impeccable service, The Savoy was also pivotal in the development of lifts, electric lighting, and fine dining (launching the culinary careers of César Ritz and Auguste Escoffier).

For the first time, the hotel has opened its doors to the high street with Melba, a patisserie and cafe that is located on The Strand at the entrance to Savoy Place. John Rushworth has created the visual identity for the cafe, which gives the area’s increasing footfall a glimpse into life at The Savoy.

Preview: ‘Live From New York!’

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“Saturday Night Live” continues the celebration of its 40th anniversary with the release of “Live From New York!”, a new documentary feature film that explores the legendary sketch comedy show’s cultural impact and evolution into an American institution. The film premiered as the opening night selection of the 2015 Tribeca Film Festival and opens today in theaters nationwide.

Pentagram’s Emily Oberman and her team have designed all of the graphics for the documentary, including the identity, poster and motion graphics in the film and its trailer. A devoted fan who has watched SNL since the beginning, Oberman has collaborated with the show on many projects over the past two decades, both before and since joining Pentagram, including three iterations of its identity, several opening title sequences, commercial parodies, and most recently, the graphics for the 40th anniversary season and the design of Saturday Night Live: The Book, the definitive visual history of the show.

New Work: 2015 Los Angeles Film Festival

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The 2015 Los Angeles Film Festival opens today with a bold identity, promotional campaign and trailer designed by Pentagram’s Emily Oberman and team. Produced by Film Independent and now in its 21st year, the Festival runs from June 10 to 18 at L.A. LIVE and showcases 74 feature films—including 39 world premieres—60 short films and over 50 new media works representing 35 countries. Simultaneously strong, colorful and evocative, the branding sets the tone for the extraordinary range of films presented at the Festival.

New Work: ‘Revolution of the Eye’

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Award-winning dramas and groundbreaking comedies aside, television is seldom considered high art. But this hasn’t always been the case. Revolution of the Eye: Modern Art and the Birth of American Television is a new exhibition at the Jewish Museum that explores how avant-garde art influenced and shaped the look and content of network television in its formative years, from the late 1940s to the mid-1970s. Pentagram’s Abbott Miller and his team have created a striking design for the exhibition and its accompanying catalogue that highlights the connection between television and modern art movements like Abstract Expressionism, Pop Art and Minimalism.

We Gave an X

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In the run up to the 2015 UK General Election, much was written about the disengagement between voters and politicians. This led to a widespread prediction of voter apathy that was fuelled by vocal non-voters like Russell Brand.

To tackle this disengagement, Naresh Ramchandani and Marina Willer launched I Give an X, a campaign that encouraged people to take pride in their vote. Living online, it consisted of a website with 93 downloadable Xs, a powerful video manifesto encouraging people to vote, and a link to the voter registration form.

New Work: Shakespeare in the Park 2015

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Paula Scher’s iconic Public Theater identity goes to pieces in the campaign for this year’s Shakespeare in the Park, the annual free performances presented by The Public Theater at the Delacorte Theater in Central Park. This summer’s program pairs “The Tempest”, Shakespeare’s stormy classic about the magic of storytelling, with the fairy-tale romance “Cymbeline”.

Scher’s campaign for the summer performances previews the look of the graphics for the Public’s 2015-2016 season. The Shakespeare in the Park poster campaigns used to exist apart from the fall season campaigns, but over the past few years the graphics for the Public’s most famous program have helped establish the seasonal look for all aspects of the institution.

Playing off the word “free,” this year’s design is handmade and exists as lines of sliced typography that are cut through photography or large-scale words. The tempest of type creates a mini-identity that both dramatically updates and functions within the familiar Public Theater brand.

Last Folio Book: A Photographic Memory

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In 2006, serendipity led two former political exiles, photographer Yuri Dojc and documentary producer Katya Krausova, to an abandoned Jewish school in their homeland, Slovakia. Abandoned since 1942, when all its students had been deported to concentration camps, Dojc photographed the building and disintegrating school books within it. These photographs were the beginning of Last Folio, an international travelling exhibition and documentary film.

In commemoration of the 70th anniversary of the end of World War Two, Dojc and Krausova have released a book, Last Folio: A photographic Memory, that documents their exploration into Slovakia’s pre-war Jewish culture.

Auf einer Reise durch ihr Heimatland Slowakei entdeckten Fotograf Yuri Dojc und die Filmemacherin Katya Krausova eher zufällig ein verlassenes, halb verfallenes jüdisches Schulhaus. Als wäre die Zeit stillgestanden seit jenem Tag im Jahr 1942 – als sämtliche Schüler und Lehrer dieser Schule von den Nazis in ein Konzentrationslager deportiert wurden – befanden sich darin noch alle Schulbücher, so, wie sie zurückgelassen worden waren.

Dojc fotografierte das verfallene Gebäude und die darin zurückgebliebenen Schulbücher. Da für Dojc die Bücher allesamt Überlebende einer schrecklichen Zeit waren, versuchte er, sie mit seinen Fotos auch so zu portraitieren. Diese Fotografien waren der Anfang von Last Folio, einer internationalen Wanderausstellung und einem Dokumentarfilm.

Im Gedenken an den 70. Jahrestag des Endes des zweiten Weltkrieges haben Dojc und Krausova nun ein Buch veröffentlicht: Last Folio – ein fotografisches Gedächtnis, das ihre Reise in die jüdisch-slowakische Vorkriegskultur dokumentiert.