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Tag Archives: Typography

New Work: ‘Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt’


Opening titles for “Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt,” the new Netflix comedy from “30 Rock” creators Tina Fey and Robert Carlock.

In the extremely funny “Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt,” the new comedy from “30 Rock” creators Tina Fey and Robert Carlock, the titular heroine is rescued from a doomsday cult after 15 years of living underground and must use her irrepressibly cheery spirit to navigate contemporary New York. Pentagram’s Emily Oberman and her team have designed the identity and opening titles for the show, which debuts today on Netflix.

Played by Ellie Kemper (Erin on “The Office”), Kimmy is the living embodiment of spunk (and normally we hate spunk), a fish-out-of-water who is naïve and sheltered but blissfully well-equipped to deal with any situation, usually with hilarious results. Oberman’s ebullient graphics echo Kimmy’s sunny disposition with bold typography, a bright tween-age color palette, and a generous sprinkling of fairy dust. For the opening titles, the designers collaborated with “songify” artists the Gregory Brothers, who brought their special magic to a beyond-catchy theme song, written by composer Jeff Richmond, and who also created an extended viral-video version of the song.

New Work: ‘Public Speaking’

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In the two decades that Pentagram’s Paula Scher has worked with The Public Theater, there’s one thing she’s never designed for the institution: an annual report.

To celebrate an important season that saw an increase in membership and donors, and as well as the development of several landmark productions, The Public has issued “Public Speaking,” a review of its activities during 2013-2014. Drawing on her iconic identity for The Public, Scher has designed a lively and engaging publication that helps the institution strengthen its relationship with its community and audiences.

From Russia With Type

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Pentagram’s Paula Scher has created the cover design for this weekend’s edition of The New York Times Book Review, a special issue devoted to the subject of Russia. Inspired by Constructivist typography, Scher’s design suggests the breadth of the issue’s content, which ranges from contemporary Russia to its political history and its relationship with the US. The arrangement of type reads not only as RUSSIA, but also as USSR and USA. (Scher has a longstanding love for Constructivist type and helped revive its use in postmodern design; her iconic Best of Jazz poster turns 35 this year.)

Scher recently designed the cover of another special issue of the Book Review that focused on women and power.

Project Team: Paula Scher, partner-in-charge and designer; Irina Koryagina, designer.

Street Number

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As the building boom envelops New York City, Pentagram’s studio at 204 Fifth Avenue finds itself squeezed by construction on both sides. The latest in our series of typographic banners announces our address amid all the scaffolding. Designed by Abbott Miller, the flag features typography set in Calibre, also recently seen in Miller’s new monograph Design and Content and its accompanying exhibition.

New Work: Rainbow Room

A New York destination unlike any other, the Rainbow Room is the jewel in the crown of Rockefeller Center, the Art Deco masterpiece at the heart of midtown Manhattan. Located on the 65th floor of 30 Rock, the dining and entertainment space is in a glittering landmarked room with breathtaking 360-degree views of the New York skyline and beyond. The iconic venue reopened last week after a major renovation that reimagines the space with contemporary design. As part of the reopening, Pentagram’s Michael Gericke and his team have created an elegant new identity for the Rainbow Room that celebrates and pays tribute to its extraordinary style and spectacular vistas.

“The room, the views and the city below are grand, panoramic and timeless – so it was inevitable they are echoed in the identity,” said Gericke of the wordmark. The designers carefully considered the relationship of the Rainbow Room’s graphic program to Rockefeller Center’s iconic architecture and signature typography.

New Work: Albertine

Uniquely devoted to French works in French and English, Albertine is a new bookshop and reading room opened by the Cultural Services of the French Embassy in New York. The only French-language bookstore in the city, Albertine offers the most comprehensive selection of French-language books and English translations in the United States, with over 14,000 titles from 30 French-speaking countries in genres including novels, non-fiction, art, comics and graphic novels, and children’s books.

Pentagram’s Abbott Miller has designed a distinctive new identity for Albertine inspired by French vernacular typography. Miller and his team worked closely on the project with the store’s founder, Antonin Baudry, the Cultural Counselor of the French Embassy. The shop has been envisioned as less a retail space than a reading room that invites visitors to linger, and the identity invokes the connection between books, knowledge, and Enlightenment, with references to Parisian Art Deco.

Albertine is celebrating its opening this week with a six-night festival that showcases the store as a new hub for French-American intellectual exchange and debate. Curated by cultural critic Greil Marcus, the event runs from October 14-19 and features discussions with Mad Men creator Matthew Weiner, filmmaker Olivier Assayas (Irma Vep) and author and filmmaker Marjane Satrapi (Persepolis).