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Tag Archives: Typography

New Work: Taiwan Pavilion at the Venice Architecture Biennale

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Domesticity is perhaps one of the most fundamental beginnings of architecture—realized as bedrooms, dining rooms, bathrooms, dressing rooms, etc.—each devoted to a programmatic specificity. The Taiwan Pavilion at the 2014 Venice Architecture Biennale explores the idea of private domesticity inverted as public space in the exhibition Township of Domestic Parts: Made in Taiwan. Curated and designed by the noted architect Jimenez Lai, the pavilion is a collection of nine small houses, each embodying one domestic program. Pentagram’s Natasha Jen and her team have designed an identity for the exhibition that showcases the theme in a lively mix of colorful graphics and custom typography, both in English and Chinese.

Lai’s pavilion design is a response to the official Biennale theme of “Fundamentals,” set out by the Biennale’s chief curator, Rem Koolhaas. Scattered within the gallery of the Palazzo delle Prigioni, the pavilion’s collection of small houses forms an interior township of misfit parts. Each structure stands for one domestic activity or program, such as the House of Sleep (the bedroom), the House of Social Eating (the dining room), the House of Shit (the bathroom), and so on. The various houses are embodied by frame-like, freestanding structures that Lai calls “superfurniture.”

Type Dancing: A Visual Identity for Riotous Company

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Pentagram’s Harry Pearce and his team have created a new visual identity and a series of performance materials for Riotous Company, the dance and theatre group that creates large-scale performances and chamber pieces with a worldwide collective of composers, dancers, singers, actors, writers and visual artists. Riotous Company’s work has been created in collaboration with leading companies and festivals in South Africa, Cuba, Nepal, Palestine, Portugal, Macedonia, Denmark and the UK.

The logotype was created by staging the typography, manually building a miniature stage and allowing the type to perform. The core idea of type integrating with performance weaves through all the poster work and becomes the visual language for the brand.

Preview: Philadelphia Museum of Art

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Pentagram’s Paula Scher has designed a bold new identity for the Philadelphia Museum of Art that puts “art” front and center. Iconic and expressive, the logo customizes the letter “A” in the word “art” to highlight the breadth of the Museum’s remarkable collection. The identity launches this week with the unveiling of plans for a major renewal and expansion of the Museum by the celebrated architect Frank Gehry.

One of the largest museums in the United States, the Philadelphia Museum of Art has a world-class collection of more than 227,000 works and more than 200 galleries presenting painting, sculpture, works on paper, decorative arts, textiles, and architectural settings from Asia, Europe, Latin America, and the United States. The Museum’s Greek Revival-style Main Building is one of Philadelphia’s great landmarks, and its 10-acre campus anchors the western end of the city’s Benjamin Franklin Parkway.

New Work: American Institute of Architects


A video manifesto for the repositioning of AIA reveals the “We” within the “I” of the organization’s acronym.

When the American Institute of Architects membership arrives at the 2014 AIA National Convention in Chicago this weekend, they’ll be greeted by a distinctive new look for the organization. Designed by Pentagram’s Michael Bierut and his team, the program features a new proprietary typeface, AIArchitype, and is part of a comprehensive repositioning of the organization.

The American Institute of Architects is this country’s largest professional association of design professionals. Nearing its 160th year and facing challenges familiar to many professional organizations (the global economic downturn, the revolutionary effect of technology, an ever-more-diverse potential membership base), the AIA undertook a sweeping repositioning process, intended to reinforce the relevance of the AIA for members and the general public alike. Pentagram was selected as design consultants to support the communications process.

Preview: Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum

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Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum today announces a new name and graphic identity, custom typeface and website to accompany the expansion of the museum, which will open to the public on December 12. Designed by Pentagram’s Eddie Opara and team, the bold identity establishes a flexible branding system for the museum. Opara’s customized characters for the wordmark have been fully developed into a new typeface, Cooper Hewitt, created by Chester Jenkins of Village in collaboration with Pentagram.

Opara and his team worked closely with Cooper Hewitt and Jenkins to develop the identity. Located in the historic Andrew Carnegie Mansion in New York, Cooper Hewitt is part of the Smithsonian Institution, the group of 19 museums and galleries administered by the U.S. government. In a first, the new Cooper Hewitt identity has been conceived as a design that truly belongs to the people: The identity also exists as a new typeface that will be made available free to the public, who are encouraged to utilize it in their own designs. The font has also been acquired for the museum’s permanent collection.

“We are spreading good design by making our elegant new typeface, Cooper Hewitt, available as a free download on cooperhewitt.org, as well as collecting it as an important example of the design process,” says Cooper Hewitt director Caroline Baumann. “We look forward to seeing how the public uses this new design tool in their lives.”

Opara also helped develop the museum’s new name. Formerly the Smithsonian’s Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum, the new name replaces “National” with “Smithsonian” and eliminates the hyphen, simplifying the brand while emphasizing its heritage.

New Work: Matter

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Matter is a digital magazine devoted to long-form journalism about everything from science and technology to politics and pop culture. Born out of a Kickstarter campaign in 2012, Matter relaunches this week as the flagship general-interest publication of Medium, the publishing platform established by Twitter co-founders Ev Williams and Biz Stone. Pentagram’s Luke Hayman and team have designed a new identity for Matter, introduced as part of the magazine’s revamp.

Hayman and his team worked closely with Matter editor-in-chief Mark Lotto and the in-house design team of Erich Nagler and Indhira Rojas to create an identity that establishes the publication as an unique editorial brand. Matter’s stories are wide-ranging and in-depth, written from a viewpoint that is both smart and subversive, and the magazine wanted an identity that was irreverent and had a sense of spontaneity.

New Work: Shakespeare in the Park 2014

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The works of William Shakespeare span from the lightest comedies to the darkest tragedies, a range celebrated in this year’s productions of Shakespeare in the Park, the annual free performances presented by The Public Theater at the Delacorte Theater in Central Park. This summer’s program juxtaposes Much Ado About Nothing, one of Shakespeare’s most joyful works, with King Lear, one of his most devastating.

Paula Scher’s campaign for the 2014 festival sets the two plays against each other, with the lively green and yellow of Much Ado balanced by the shadowy black and gray of Lear. The contrasting points of view are paired in dramatically skewed typography, a first for the annual campaign. The type is set in Knockout, the font of the Public Theater identity.